Learning Target Descriptions

Integrated Math – Learning Goals

 

1.01 – I can use function notation appropriately.

2.01 - I can interpret differences in the distributions of two or more sets of data by comparing their shapes, centers, and spreads, accounting for the possible effects of any outliers.

2.02 - I can analyze the distributions of one or more sets of data, choosing the appropriate measures of center and spread based on the shape of a distribution or effects of possible outliers.

2.03 - I can create a two-way frequency table from a set of data on two categorical variables.

2.04 - I can calculate relative frequencies from two-way tables.

2.05 - I can use relative frequencies to describe possible associations and trends in the data.

2.06 - I can choose the best representation and appropriate scale to construct a plot for a set of data, including dot plots, histograms, and box plots.

2.07 - I can calculate (using technology) and interpret the standard deviation of one or more sets of data.

2.08 - I can estimate and interpret the standard deviation of one or more sets of data from a distribution.

3.01 - I can interpret and explain a linear pattern given a graph, table, contextual situation, recursive rule or function rule and translate between each representation

3.02 - I can interpret and explain how changing values of numerical terms in a linear functions impacts the graph, table, contextual situation, recursive rule or function rule

3.03 - I can write a recursive rule (e.g. Now-Next rule) for linear patterns given a graph, table, contextual situation or function rule.

3.04 - I can write a function rule (e.g. y= or f(x)=) for linear patterns given a graph, table, contextual situation, or recursive rule.

3.05 - I can make a scatterplot for two variables, describe how the variables are related, and find an appropriate function to model the data

3.06 - I can assess the fit of a linear model by examining the correlation coefficient (calculated using technology).

3.07 - I can interpret the slope and intercept of a linear model in the context of the data.

3.08 - I can identify possible explanations for an association between two variables, including cause-and-effect.

3.09 - I can represent questions about linear functions with an equation or inequality.

3.10 - I can solve a linear equation or inequality using tables, graphs, or algebraic methods.

3.11 - I can defend the reasonableness of a solution according to the context of the problem.

3.12 - I can explain the strengths and limitations of using graphs, tables, and rules to solve linear equations and inequalities.

3.13 - I can prove that two functions are equivalent and justify the usefulness of each form in revealing key information.

5.01 - I can write a recursive rule (e.g. Now-Next rule) for exponential patterns given a graph, table, contextual situation or function rule.

5.02 - I can write a function rule (e.g. y= or f(x)=) for exponential patterns given a graph, table, contextual situation, or recursive rule.

5.03 - I can translate a graph of an exponential or linear function and rewrite the function rule to reveal the translation.

 

 

5.04 - I can interpret and explain how changing values of the numerical terms in exponential functions impacts the graphs, table, contextual situation, recursive rule or function rule.

5.05 - I can interpret and explain an exponential pattern given a graph, table, contextual situation, recursive rule or function rule, and translate between each of the representations.

5.06 - I can represent questions using exponential equations.

5.07 - I can approximate solutions to exponential equations using tables and graphs.

5.08 - I can explain the differences between the rates of change of a linear and exponential model.

5.09 - I can prove that two functions are equivalent and justify the usefulness of each form in revealing key information.

5.10 - I can rewrite expressions using the laws of exponents including fractional exponents (with a numerator of one).

5.11 - I can create and justify the reasonableness of input values (domain) for a linear or exponential function given a contextual situation and/or the graph.

5.12 - I can defend the reasonableness of a solution according to the context of the problem.

5.13 - I can make a scatterplot for two variables, describe how the variables are related, and find an appropriate function to model the data (linear and exponential only). 

5.14 - I can justify why a^(1/n) is the nth root of a. 

6.01 - I can find the midpoint of a line segment and use it to solve problems

6.02 - I can use distance in the coordinate plane to find the perimeter of polygons and the area of triangles and rectangles.

6.03 - I can use distance and slope to prove or disprove properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles.

6.04 - I can use slope to solve problems involving parallel and perpendicular lines.

6.05 - I can break down geometric figures into recognizable components to defend formulas for area and volume, including circumference and area of a circle and volume of a cylinder, pyramid and cone.

6.06 - I can apply formulas for volume of pyramids, cones, and spheres to solve real-world problems, including composite shapes.

7.01 - I can use a table, graph, and/or context to write a quadratic function.

7.02 - I can analyze key features (zeros, y-intercept, maximum/minimum, symmetry, size and direction) of quadratic functions given a table, a rule, a verbal description, or a graph.

7.03 - I can describe the intervals of increase and decrease for a quadratic function.

7.04 - I can rewrite quadratic functions in equivalent forms (limited to factored form and expanded form)

7.05 - I can add, subtract, and multiply polynomials with degree less than or equal to 2.

7.06 - I can justify that operations (add, subtract, and multiply) with polynomials remain polynomials (limit to linear and quadratic)

7.07 - I can identify key features and an appropriate scale to graph a quadratic function, with and without technology.